DEPARTMENTS

Tuesday, May 11, 2010

[Labyrinth Lord] That's My Girl!


Following in her daddy's footsteps, my oldest daughter has got herself her first gig as a GM. Today she took her Labyrinth Lord Book to school and pitched the game to three of her friends. They were all down for the game and she did some quick and dirty character generation getting a Fighter, Magic-User and Thief out of the mix. Her teacher okayed them playing during free time in class (her teacher is awesome). One of her potential players was noted as saying, "OOOO...a bugbear. I'd like to fight one of those"

So, on the way home from work tonight I got hto hear her plans and shed a little wisdom on introducing players to the game and hpw to streamline their first experience to maximize fun and not get bogged down in rules. I explained rulings not rules and advised that she keep the adventure short and pretty straight forward.

What we came up with for her first adventure is a basic dungeon crawl trying to clear out some local abandoned mines of a morlock menace. She is going to provide a partial map of the old mines to the players and then keep her own GM's map showing the unexplored/unknown areas.

This should be fun and exciting for her. I hope she and her friends have a great time. Ten years old and she's already got her own group!

-Eli

11 comments:

  1. She should do marketing seminars. My son tried to interest his friends in D&D and they were "Meh". More interested in football, making things out of Lego and, of course the bane of any tabletop gamer, the XBox.

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  2. Another interesting side note to this, that I forgot to mention is that all her potential players are girls.

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  3. Dude, this is so freaking cool! I'm going to start prepping my seven year old now, your girl's raised the bar high.

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  4. We'll see how it goes and it's kind of late in the school year to start up but better than nothing.

    A good amount of credit has to go to her teacher for making it okay to play in class. Her teacher even recognized the educational value for math and reading and such.

    She's a young teacher with this being her first ever full-time teaching gig. She was a replacement after the original teach passed away a few months into the school year. He would have loved LL too.

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  5. I started playing at the same age at school. This was in the dark days when D&D was Satanic, but our teacher was cool and let us play anyway. My 9yr old son and 11 yr old daughter play now with all my old gaming buddies and their kids. Eli has watching their adventures.
    -J

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  6. I have to admit to being absolutely giddy to find out how their first session went today.

    I'm such a dork.

    @Baron - your stuff is awesome. I have been waiting for more installments. Not only does the Baron spin a good game report, he does his own color artwork to illustrate the story. Definitely worth a read. There is a fair amount of world-building included in those posts as well.

    -Eli

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  7. Definitely a proud daddy moment.

    We played Star Frontiers and D&D at school in 6th grade during recess if the weather was bad.

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  8. You should be proud : - )

    Maybe the marketing gurus are all wrong;
    the future of PnP RPGs is not recruiting boys, but girls . . .
    girls tend to be less interested in electronic entertainment and have a greater propensity for acting

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  9. Yeah, this has been proven a while back with White Wolf's release of it's World of Darkness games. These games, especially Vampire and Changeling, brought in huge numbers of female players into RPGs.

    As I think the line between what is girl stuff and what is boy stuff are blurred, you will see more come into the hobby. All of anna's group are smart, creative and generally pretty free-spirited and fun kids. I have met most of them on field trips and in passing and hear lots of stories from Anna.

    They are the sorts of girls who build things, act goofy and though academically proficient are not hung up on popularity and their social status. I should also mention that her players are spread across several "ethnic groups" which also challenges the misconception that tabletop gaming is only for, as my buddy (african-American himself) called "suburban white guys".

    I'll be posting details of her first session tonight or tomorrow, though I may actually have her do it.

    -Eli

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  10. Freakin awesome. Unfortunately my daughters are 15 and up and think it's weird. I am making inroads with my two nephews. Rock on.

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